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charged with trading them. 150 years since the start of america's oil rush. we're now in the place where it began. >> then natural gas that is being developed in this country at this point and time may get us to energy independence. >> years after britain declared war on hitler's germany, a new exhibition reveals what went on in winston churchill's secret underground bunker. >> it is 7:00 a.m. in washington, midday in london, and 1:00 p.m. in berlin. the israeli prime minister is meeting german chancellor merkel. the country's share a unique history. the trip includes various reminders of the holocaust. two issues are likely to dominate today's talks. the question of the settlements in the west bank, which germany opposes, and what to do about iran, which netanyahu describes as a threat to israel. >> this is the last leg of benjamin netanyahu's four-day tour. it follows talks in london, during which time hopes were raised that there could be agreements on settlements in the west bank. israel is said to be ready to restrict construction. it may not be the comprehensive freeze that the ame
aspires which is the history of the kgb in america. i don't think he fabricat the homo book you should be careful because in the same way i was careful whether or not i.f. stone hitchhiked to massachusetts so you do have some files that say he had conversations with some when he may or may not have known was the kgb agent. you can say that with confidence that there may be these documents which may say yes, we do not know that because we cannot say them so let's assume that they do. what do we know? 1936 i.f. stone had conversations with somebody who was a reporter working for the soviet wire service in america. he may or may not have known was a kgb agent and may or may not have been friendly or helpful. in 1936 he was a enthusiastic fellow traveler and very enthusiastic of the american communist party and premise supportive of tough soviet union in so far was the only country that supplied arms to the anish republic. also he was terrified of the threat of fascism. in 1937 i.f. stone of became his name because he was terrified fascism might come to america and his family was targeted.
that while america has turned over security to the iraqis, iraq is not secure. >>> facts of life. new insight into america's health. we are living longer, and the death rates for major diseases are falling. >>> dirty dealers. extraordinary undercover video reveals just how easy it is to buy a gun illegally. >>> and, sour notes. the proud members of the truly terrible orchestra, and the the proud members of the truly terrible orchestra, and the music they make. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good evening. we begin tonight with two stories literally about life and death. we have new insight into the state of america's health. we are living longer than ever. there are advances against major diseases. minorities enjoy better health, and we'll get to that in a moment. but we also got a reminder that sudden death at the hands of terrorists is still a reality in iraq. a wave of explosions throughout baghdad killed nearly 100 people and injured hundreds more today. and the 130,000 u.s. troops in that country could do little to help. under the terms of the security agreement, demanded by the iraqi
is an extraordinary icahn for latin america. he came to providence in 1960's which is when that america literature first came to international prominence and it became possibly the most popular and and most no literature in the world. it appeared in 1966 and not appear until the mid-1960s and not doing terribly well did not become later what it was to become an 1967 which was gabriel garcia marquez. his 100 years of solitude it was almost as if it was predestined it would finally cap latin-american and not all it was famous before he published it the most famous at this point* was ulysses his novel became famous oliver north america perhaps after he hadn't written the first that was it. it would be a best seller and a great latin-american novel. he just knew it. him and his friends started to write articles when even marquez was only halfway through it. it did not happen very often but it did then. most latin american novels published 500 or 1,000 would be a very good printer run in the 1960's but all of a sudden one-man publishes 8,000 was the first run and repeated a couple of weeks later and re
. and this became an occasion for me to explain in america there is a company where you can actually borrow a car and give it back in what was interesting about that too one liberian member of the fugees was that he now lives in a culture amazingly enough where a total stranger would not only lead to a carbon trusted you to bring it back, that was a real shocker. i would try to explain that you give them this piece of plastic with some numbers on and if you take off with a car or crashes there will read a letter to this company called experian and then you can buy a house and tried to explain in you realize this is absurd. no wonder is so hard for refugees to figure out our culture. look at how many layers we have piled on to something as simple as borrowing a car and ellis of consequences can be very long if you screw up. in the there were other moments that were more serious and more poignant by thing for me one of the most poignant moments of my reporting was talking to a sudanese refugee about his experience coming to the u.s. charismatic incredibly talented soccer player at an academic schol
? or is it getting stuck in the bureaucratic mud? >>> one country's trash is another country's poison. america's discarded electronics are endangering the lives of these kids half a world away. and ron claiborne travels to africa on the trail of e-waste. >>> and money rehab. one woman, 300 pairs of jeans, 160 pairs of shoes. and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders and she's not alone, we'll take you to where reckless spenders go to turn their lives around. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. >> good morning, i'm just sending a tweet out. >> are you tweeting? >> right now! it is sunday, august 2nd. twitter's everywhere. it's everywhere. >> i thought we banned it from the set? >> no, i just sent your picture out. check it out, folks. 140 characters can it really get you into trouble? a lot of times we don't even think before we tweet but you really should because what you tweet could land you in court. one woman who slammed her landlord on twitter found out the hard way and she's being sued for defamation. we're going to get into this whole legal issu
to promoting fiscal responsibility and addressing key economic challenges facing america's future. >>> good evening. i'm martin savidge. >>> the quest for peace in the middle east has been going on for generations now, and it never seems to get much easier. we got that impression again today after another apparently inconclusive meeting in london between israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu and u.s. middle east envoy george mitchell. the two men and the two nations they reprent have been searching for months now for a way to resolve their differences over israeli settlements in the west bank. the u.s. has been pushing hard for an israeli settlement freeze, and the palestinians are refusing to restart peace talks until israel halts all construction there. despite their failure to reach agreement again today, the two sides will resume talks in washington next week. both men tried to put the best face on today's talks. >> we' headway in the past five months. my government has taken several steps both of word and deed to advance course of peace. and i hope that today and in the coming week
he did lives on. for his family, he was a bargain. for america, and he was the defender of a dream. -- for his family, he was of guardian. >> we look at ted kennedy's legacy as the leading liberal in washington. welcome to "bbc world news." , broadcast you our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. >> i am mike embley in london. 70% -- 17% of the vote now counted. president karzai edges against his main rival. and one of iraq's influential leaders has died in exile in tehran. >> hello. he was the best known as american politician ever to make it -- never to make it to the white house. senator kidney -- kidnapping -- center -- senator kennedy died after a yearlong battle with brain cancer. he fought for so many causes, and the tributes have flowed in from friend and foe alike. but his career was limited by self-inflicted wounds. adam brooks reports. >> the death of edward kennedy, known as ted, leads a chasm in american politics. hughes was one of the most effective politicians of the last century -- he was one of the most effective politicians of the last century. his
and america, the iranian government blames the u.s. for fueling the protests that have engulfed the country since the controversial election of president mahmoud ahmadinejad, a cause for concern as the state department follows it closely. >> sonia gallego, thanks, sonia. >>> a top official in saddam hussein's government has been convicted of helping plan the forced removal of thousands of iraqi kurds. tariq aziz was given seven years in prison yesterday on top of a 15-year sentence he's already received for crimes against humanity. aziz served as his foreign minister and deputy prime minister. >>> in afghanistan, the taliban is claiming responsibility for a deadly bombing this morning. the remote controlled bomb went off in the western city of herat. at least ten were killed in the blast including women and children. dozens others also injured. a local police chief -- a local police chief was apparent target critically wounded. >>> in a separate attack militants killed three more u.s. troops with gunfire after attacking their convoy with a roadside bomb. that brings the death toll to six. t
their loans modified. lenders such as bank of america and wells fargo are called out for not doing enough. and ten lenders have not changed a single mortgage. >>> the s.e.c. is trying to ban a form of financial trading that benefits big wall street firms at the expense of average investors. so-called flash orders allow firms with high-powered computers to essentially peak at stock orders before they are placed. the practice has allowed those companies to rake in billions of dollars. >>> pepsico has struck a deal that will help it capitalize on changing trends. it's buying its two, main bottlers for $8 million. pepsi says it will allow the company to respond more quickly. >>> and procter & gamble can say it makes the official toilet tris of the national football league. they are announcing a sponsorship deal that allows the company to add a label to products, calling them the official locker room product of the nfl. >>> a new report might have parents of newborns crying right alongside their children. government estimates that a child born today will cost $290,000 by the time they finish h
%, but this not our lives, this is our hobby. >> pageant owner annette hill believes america's backlash against pageants all began with the precocious images of jonbenet ramsey parading across the stage in 1996. ♪ ♪ >> next on "larry king live" -- >> she says the media tends to focus on the negative. >> do you want to go into child protective services? >> as do movies like "little miss sunshine". ♪ >> some people in america are disgusted by these pageants. >> we well, i think that's their opinion. we're not going to stop doing them. parents enjoy showcasing their kids. what is wrong with that? as long as you keep it in a positive aspect, i don't think anything is wrong with that. >> the spray tans, whis it so necessary? why can't children be beautiful the way they are? >> the tan, i mean, i just think it looks pretty to be tanned. you know? swimsuit models, whatever. you want to have a nice glow to you. >> but she's 4. >> but she's 4. >> look in the bathroom -- >> as for the over the top costumes? many people are concerned they're sexualizing these very young girls. do you think the show
will visit places that have tried this experiment, including states right here in america and you will meet a man and woman whose lives were saved by the current health care system and they say they may not be here if the government controlled health care. >> i promise you, we will pass reform by the end of this year, because the american people need it. sean: president obama has spent the majority of his first year in office attempting to push through a $1 trillion health care initiative aimed at controlling medical costs and extending coverage to millions of uninsured americans. >> if we step back from this challenge at this moment, we are consigning our children to skyrocketing premiums and deficits. sean: after the practice has called for overhaul of the system and the president appears to be making a major concession. >> whether we have it or don't have it is the not the entirety of health care reform. this is one sliver of it. >> i think what is important is choice and competition and i'm convinced at the end of the day the plan will have both of those, but that is not the essential e
paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. >> good morning. i love that music. it's sunday, august 16th. >>> other news this morning, president obama wrapping up his trio of town halls. hoping to turn the tide in the health care debate. we have a report -- a reporter traveling with the president and also talking with jake tapper. who's hosti ining "this week." >> also, a fascinating look inside the health insurance industry. this is probably the most high-profiled whistle blower. somebody who had a real convergent moment. when she saw people lined up in the rain for health care. he's got the playbook of the big insurance company. he's spilling it out. >> also, the latest on the heart-wrenching story of an 8-year-old american boy abducted by his own mother, stuck in an italian orphanage. while father tries desperately to get him back here. >>> and also, this sounds kind of ridiculous, dogs teaching kids how to read. but it's a very successful program. highly trained teachers in a certain way. we'll explain how that works coming up. >>> we begin with the california wildfires,
of air america and dana lohse affiliated with the st. louis tea party. dana, why so much anger, mistrust and misinformation out there? we wonder, has this whole thing devovled to the point where it is unproductive but potentially dangerous? >> i don't think it can be dangerous. congress is sfonsable for setting the tone. congress hasn't allowed for discourse for one of the most important pieces of legislation in american history that is what people are reacting to. they are tired of calling their legislator and leaving a message with an aide. we are seeing people who are flocking there because they have their elected official's ear and they want to express their conditions about the health care legislation. >> ron, what about the argument, this is not organized, but a grassroots movement and deeply concerned about health care. >> that is fine to get involved and it is good to show up at a town hall meeting and have a conversation. you have to have the conversation and have the discussion. many of these people, not all, many of these people are clearly showing up to shut the conversation
-- >> it is a similar statement in town halls across america, no to socialized health care. >> the health care now are just sucks. that you have to wait six weeks for a dental appointment, have you ever seen british tea to? how can you think is good? >> how is this health care going to help hawes wen jiabao from canada and great britain are telling us -- when people from canada and great britain are telling us not to do anything? >> the reality is, it has not worked. it has made people more ill. we spend a lot of money can't -- and it gets very bad. >> there has also -- have also been tv ads forecasting british health care rationing. but there are more americans that have a more positive view. >> we do not have the chance for medical and thus repay for it. -- unless we pay for it. >> of course, a state-run health service is not even being considered by the white house. but that has not stopped u.k. citizens from being dragged into the debate. this week', the president honored stephen hawking. according to one report, the scientists would not have survived under the president's plan. stephen hawkin
the money comes from. >> federal aid? >> how is c-span funded? america's cable companies created c-span is that public service, a private business initiative -- no government mandate, no government money. . >> the main opposition party has a shadow team or shadow cabinet who breach the main government ministers. you haven't foreign secretary and in the shadow foreign secretary in the conservative opposition. it is his job to challenge him, question the foreign secretary, and potentially would hold the position of foreign secretary if he were elected in the next general election. >> most of the recent polls show the conservative party with a 15% lead. what role is foreign policy playing in british politics right now? >> foreign-policy has been high on the agenda because of their commitment currently in afghanistan, and before that, in iraq. the positions of the two main parties have not been hugely different. on both sides of the political divide, what you are going to see is a much greater degree of caution about taking on major overseas military ahead. you are going to see pressur
that excited for anything. >>> for some of you, your local news is up next. >> for everyone else, "america this morning" continues after this. hi help you? we're shopping for car insurance, and our friends said we should start here. good friends -- we compare our progressive direct rates, apples to apples, against other top companies, to help you get the best price. how do you do that? with a touch of this button. can i try that? [ chuckles ] wow! good luck getting your remote back. it's all right -- i love this channel. shopping less and savingore. th'progressive. call or click today. clean so deep... ...it's like your old mop's worst nightmare. ♪ [ thunder crashes ] [ man ] love stinks. ♪ love stinks! ♪ yeah! yeah! [ female announcer ] swiffer wet cloths clean better than a mop with new cleansers that attract dirt deep into the cloth and lock it away. new swiffer wet cloths clean better, or your money back. ♪ love stinks! i felt this deep lingering pain that was a complete mytery to me. my doctor diagnosed it as fibromyalgia muscle pain and then he recommnded lyrica., fibromyalgi
of the family's legendary seaside home. >>> welcome to "america this morning" on this thursday. ir. 'm ii' >> i'm jeremy hubbard. setenar tod nnr edy leaves hised cherished hyannisport home for y e last time today.ke lwinnwillie in repose at the jfk library in boston, beginning tonight, where thousands are expected to pay their respects over the next two days. >> president obama will deliver a eulogy at kennedy's funeral mass on saturday. >> and a special election to fill kennedy's senate seat is scheduled for early this year. that is unless lawmakers change the state succession law. >>> this morning, the kennedy family is gathering to say farewell to a much-loved father, uncle and brother. >> reporter: good morning, jeremy and vinita. after a day of tributes, this is the first of three days of farewell for senator kennedy. there will be ceremonies for him in boston and in arlington, virginia, before he's laid to rest on saturday night. today, senator edward kennedy begins the long, final voyage of a statesman. >> he was ready to go. >> reporter: with flags at halftaff on capitol hill, and amon
this experiment, including states right here in america and you will meet a man and woman whose lives were saved by the current health care system and they say they may not be here if the government controlled health care. >> i promise you, we will pass reform by the end of this year, because the american people need it. sean: president obama has spent the majority of his first year in office attempting to push through a $1 trillion health care initiative aimed at controlling medical costs and extending coverage to millions of uninsured americans. >> if we step back from this challenge at this moment, we are consigning our children to skyrocketing premiums and deficits. sean: after the practice has called for overhaul of the system and the president appears to be making a major concession. >> whether we have it or don't have it is the not the entirety of health care reform. this is one sliver of it. >> i think what is important is choice and competition and i'm convinced at the end of the day the plan will have both of those, but that is not the essential element. sean: what caused the white hou
is the biotech company up by around 2% and that's after analysts at bank of america and merrill lynch upgraded that stock to overweight from underweight and increased the company's price starting. we are watching ubs. that stock is lower, in line with the rest of the financials here in zurich. we are expecting the deal with the u.s. to be signed in washington later on today. that's when we may get some more details out on the settlement and sales including how many client names will be handed over to the u.s. authorities. there's a possibility of when the swiss government will sell its stake in ubs. ubs authorities have said they're preparing criminal investigations into 150 ubs clients in the u.s. and the wall street journal is reporting that up to 10 swiss and european banks among them. chris swiss and julius bear were identified in the ubs tax probe. that's after ubs clients in the u.s. have come forward and disclosed their ubs accounts, also other foreign accounts and they have said that they're with either credit suisse or other banks. but that doesn't necessarily mean that those banks wi
about $13 million collectively if they would go on a tour, a ten-city tour of america, and then there's an option to have some concert ins europe. >> it's very interesting. we have the graphic up here, who gets paid what. can they do this tour without janet jackson? >> well, i think it's a whole lot less valuable. janet jackson, the baby of the family, ironically now, has taken the position of michael in the family. she is the primary bread winner, as was he in his heyday. no, i think that it would be greatly diminished if janet did not join, and i'm hearing she's a little reluctant. >> she's reluctant. why would she be reluctant? >> because that puts her in the spot that her big brother michael was in all those years, which was to be the one to be pestered, let's go on concert tour. let's go on tour because we, the brothers, need money. >> right. >> i think la toya saved her money pretty well, but the brothers did not. >> right. we hear rumors that there is this sort of not particularly -- there is some serious sibling rivalry going on behind the scenes in terms of how this potential
>>> good morning, america. this morning, did stocks tumble because america stopped shopping? we look inside the back-to-school shopping cart and ask, did the experts declare economic victory too soon? and some of the smartest analysts in the country tell us what to expect next. >>> the swine flu vaccine shortage. less than one-third of what was promised will be ready by october. why? and who gets it now? who does not? >>> caught on tape. the police beating that has a major city on-edge. >>> a spurned wife, speaking out. jenny sanford, wife of the south carolina governor, and what she really thinks of the argentine mistreasure. >>> and a conservative republican in sequins on "dancing with the stars"? why tom delay is on the show. is the man they call the hammer, why tom delay is on the show. is the man they call the hammer, ready for the hustle? captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> good morning, america. diane sawyer with chris cuomo on this tuesday, august 18th. and robin is away. the dow seemed to roll back since monday. >> the market goes up and goes down. what does it mean for
estate market. had no government entity existed when private mortgage capital tried up and 2008, america's housing market would have come to a complete halt throwing out -- throwing our needs the commission into a deeper recession. we need only look at the current status of the if affairs in the commercial and mortgage market to see how different things might be today in the tradition -- if the traditional -- if the traditional regular mortgage market without fannie may and freddie mac. for those reasons realtors believe pure privatisation of the gse is unacceptable. rather, we support a secondary mortgage market model that includes some level of government participation, protect the taxpayers and ensures all creditworthy consumers have reasonable access to affordable mortgage capital. nar is currently conducting research to determine what model for the secondary mortgage market would best achieve these goals. we will share that information with you as soon as it is completed. for now, i would like to briefly outline a set of nine principles that nar's board of directors has adopted and
of this nra is the customer may not pick his chicken. america is about consumer choice and he imitated for the justice how the chickens were selected in the name of efficiency and the justices laughed. then when they laughed. >> host: one of the things the nra forbade was actually looking at a chicken and say i want that one. >> guest: and you could not do that in in a time when there was tuberculosis and not to antibiotics picking you're own chicken was important for health reasons. you don't want a sick chicken and this is known as the sick chicken case and the justices sided with the shecter brothers, what about the commerce clause and so on. and there was a lot of discussion around that. and it was an enormous advantage big test if ms. nra had stood in we would have a kind of intervention that we have in agriculture in business so it it should america forever. the never talk back cap and in the english people saw that right away. nra killed and 20 minutes, in america there were show star if they did not know what two say and the result was various. >> host: one of the interesting s
. >> that's why mom and dad aren't reminding america, hey, little baby, stimulus turns six today. >> angry next door neighbors. >> finally, we always like when athletes or people around sports get involves in politics. mike allen, who is the latest? >> the republicans are discovering that the nfl is a great place to recruit. they feel it helps them with their message of commitment, hard work, valus and so there's now a couple people who are trying to follow in the footsteps. >> did michael vick make an announcement last night? >> no politics in the michael vick interview. he said he found god, which we were happy about. >> he found god and he loves animals, please. who is your pr company? >> you don't like god or animals, mika? >> i just like reality. >> no, you know what, mika grew up in the mean northeast streets of harlem and she's a little more cynical. >> you're talking to a woman who has gutted a deer, okay? >> you know, by the way, they make you do that at madeira before you graduate. >> if you do it, where do you get to go? william. >> is it a problem that they interviewed me and w
to be something perfect. so -- and we've got to remember, too. look this really isn't a humanitarian megs. america did not go to afghanistan for al true wis sick and national security interest. that's going to have to be the goal of the campaign. and so how is the fight going? i mean, early on we heard from u.s. commanders on the ground and saying, look, there's not enough afghan troops in this. >> there's not. they are doubling the size of the afghan army. as i last saw it, it was a hodge podge of different foot soldiers from different world wars. and when i last saw them, he actually lies to the back home. so this is going to be difficult. it's true, the momentum right now is the taliban and in a war like this, if you are not winning, you are almost losing. america may not lose it but they may not win it. the true victory, it's going to have to come with some kind of a functioning system, a decentralized system. >> u.s. commanders say there's not a true military system. >> and they did right. sorry to pardon the pump but they did right. the solution is not going to be in the trenches. you've got
future. >> he came home a free man. >> it is absolutely shameful, it is horrible. >> in america, condemnation has been swift. but the u.k. government is treading a more difficult path. while the foreign secretary has criticized out the glop -- al- megrahi's reception, he refused to say whether the scottish justice secretary decision was right. >> obviously the site of a mass murderer getting a hero's welcome in tralee is deeply upsetting, deeply distressing. above all, for the 270 families who grieve every day for the loss of their loved one. but also anyone who's got an ounce of humanity in them. and i think that is the overriding emotion people will be feeling today. >> it has been left to the first minister to defend the decision. he said any pressure for al- megrahi to drop his appeal certainly did not come from his government, since release on compassionate grounds didn't require it. >> we have no interest in mr. al-megrahi dropping his appeal. that was not our motivation. we had no interest. and we made it clear we had no interest in dropping the appeal. that was a decisio
the states and that means any city or state in america if her opinion is upheld what can ban all guns in the jurisdictions. and if her opinion is not reversed that is what will happen in america and i would note the supreme court in ruling on that case, the hell lowercase but told clearly for the first time the second amendment is an individual right and applied to the district of columbia which effectively band firearms in the district of columbia and they said that was not constitutional, that the citizens of the district have a constitutional right to keep and bear arms and it cannot be eliminated so if the sotomayor opinion is upheld i can only say the second amendment be viable in the district of columbia and now the other cities and states in the country. madam president, with regard to the takings case one of the most significant taking cases in recent years she ruled against a private land owner who had his property taken and he intended to build a pharmacy. a developer working with the city utilized the power of the city to attempt to extort money from the individual so that
of the questions that we have been asking all week, and get some answers! from new york, good night, america. see you tomorrow. [captioning made possible by fox news channel] captioned by the national captioning institute ---www.ncicap.org---^ bret: next on "special report" senator ted kennedy dies of brain cancer, and will advocates of healthcare reform try to use kennedy's death to boost their cause? a former c.i.a. inspector general talks about dick cheney's influence in his report on enhanced interrogations and south carolina's embattled governor answered a call from list second in command to step down. all that, plus the fox all-stars, right here, right now. welcome to washington. i'm he bret baier. senator edward kennedy is being remembered are today as an iconic larger than life figure who was the anchor of america's first family of politics. kennedy died tuesday night at his cape cod home a little more than a year after being diagnosed with brain cancer. it was the final chapter in a he very public and often troubled life. >> at the end of our journey and always before us shines that idea
-new hour of america's news headquarters. >>> hurricane bill continues to churn at sea, many are wondering how dangerous the storm will be without a direct hit. we're tracking bill right here and we'll have the latest forecast. >> julie: and at a kentucky prison, medium security prison set on fire by inmates during a riot. so what caused all the chaos? >> once a prisoner and free man, he is back in libya and his president welcoming home with open arms. how is it with our relationship with libya just as things were warming up? >> julie: hurricane bill making its way up the east coast. not expected to make landfall in the u.s. but the category two storm is creating high surf and strong rip currents all along the eastern seaboard. tropical storm warning is in effect for the state of massachusetts. domenica davis is tracking it all for us. >> yes, a category two and it's expected to pass several hundred miles to the east of cape cod. it's expected to make the closest path to the united states and then first thing tomorrow morning. it's sitting 400 miles south of nantucket and continue on the n
they and other things threatening to the america future for enterprise. i am glad they had to stop and come back. i think the cooperatives are a much better idea than a government am run healthcare system for americans. it's failed policy and it's foolish politics. >> i still, governor in your state you ran a wonderful state lots of poor folks in arkansas and what are they going to do if they get sick? are they going to go to the emergency room? isn't that why we started? aren't we gabbing to square one? we have been having all of this impassioned debate. fooch are people welling and being yelled at. >> before this was an s chip we did our program first that put a safety net under people who's children were making too much money for medicaid but not muf f enough for the private insurance party. there was buy in. there was responsibility. it worked beautifully. when the president comes out and said there are 47 million uninsured americans the reality geraldo there are a lot of those people who couldn't be insured they choose not to be because they would rather spends their money on a new car ther
to be written in a junior high school level. that is what we need in america today. [applause] >> i'll try. no. 12. >> good morning, and welcome to london on, pa -- lebanon, pa. will you ever vote for a bill that gives non u.s. citizens access to a taxpayer paid free health insurance? >> i will not support a bill which gives health coverage to illegal immigrants. [applause] #13. who has 13? >> a good morning. president obama and you have constantly stated that we will be allowed to keep our current plans. but how can we keep them if they don't exist? more specifically,@@@@@@@ @ @ @ >> more specifically, how many americans work for these employers with payrolls that exceed $251,000 and what will happen to them when the employers drop their current coverage because they cannot afford a 2-8% payroll tax? >> directed only to the companies which do not have health coverage. we are not going at a tax to companies that have health care. so that as represented, if you like your current plan, you can maintain it. >> [inaudible] >> let me say to you that i will not support a senate bill which has that k
attracted interest from america's beat necks in the 1950's. coincidentally with the interest of american diplomats and the central intelligence agency, people like jack karowac, who was an absolutely unknown writer, were developing an interest in buddhism, generally. first in zen buddhism and secondly through the work of robert campbell in buddhism. the mid 1950's were a period of cultural ferment in the united states with the beat neck movement that would eventually become the support basis for the tibetan resistance, but eventually took about 20 years, because something else was happening in 1955 when geshae sailed into new york harbor. here in washington, d.c., president eisenhower was trying to figure out how best to fight against international communism. in a series of national security council meetings throughout 955, he had been presented with options from open warfare to covert sub version of russian and chinese communist activity around the world. it was only recently learned that in the early 1950's, the u.s. intelligence services had picked up definitive information that russi
about america. where are the slogans that republicans used to use? these colors don't run. people have forgotten about that. host: here is a message from twitter. cspanwj is how you can reach us on twitter. this piece concerns the york politics. 19 months after ending his disastrous run for the presidency, rudy guiliani is clearing a path for a possible race for governor in 2010. arnold joins us from tennessee. we're asking about then bernanke is possible second term as the fed schair. caller: good morning, to be honest i guess we are doing the best we can with what we have to work with. have you ever read a book called "the creature from jekyll island." the author is g.edward griffin. there is another book by w albert called "the coming battle" which was released in 1899 and has just been read the released. the united states is under the control of the federal reserve. that is the main reason for all of the problems we're having. we need to realize that we need to love our neighbor as we love ourselves. all these people who were calling in here and calling obama a fraud, in the bible
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in america, and freedom of speech means to express yourselves, but if somebody else wants to express themselves, to have quiet and decorum and civility so we can exchange ideas. there are a great many subjects of importance in washington today. we're working very hard on global warming, the president has put immigration on the agenda for later this year, we are working on judicial nominations and confirmation of supreme court justice sotomayor. we are working hard on the issue of economic recovery, and there are already some positive signs. but it is too early with less than six months on a two-year program to really know. the preliminary indications are positive. but they are tentative. it is understandable that there is a lot of concern in america about what is happening in our country because of the loss of more than 4 million jobs. people are losing their health insurance. there is uncertainty of the future, concern about the large deficit, concern about the large national debt. after being in touch with 12 million people in pennsylvania for meetings, calls, letters, there is a l
at the conditions in that country. just what has america's ally, hamid karzai, accomplished during his five years in office? it's a matter of considerable interest in germany, which has 4,000 troops in afghanistan. is karzai doing a good job? not according to this story by germanese deutsche velia. it's a how they see it report. >> reporter: many afghans are unhappy with his style of government. he's been criticized for handing official positions to powerful warlords. the organization transparency international says afghanistan is one of the most corrupt countries in the world. >> translator: the government in kabul is only interested in its own survival, as long as it remains rife with corruption and nepotism instead of concentrating on delivering good leadership, it will only be able to survive with military help from western countries. >> reporter: efforts to rebuild the country have made some progress, but more slowly than many had hoped. afghanistan has received billions of euros in aid, including $550 million from germany. but half of afghan stils still below the poverty line. >> translator
people on his hands now free and celebrated as a hero back home. tonight, one of america's closest allies rejects the accusations that it struck a deal to free the lockerbie bomber and reaction from the former leader of the investigation, here in the u.s. >> a present inferno. fire consumes a kentucky prison in the midst of a massive riots. now investigators want to know how the prison descended into chaos. >> plus a victim of its own success. as the cash for clunkers program speeds to its monday cut off, folks across the country are racing to the dealer hoping for a last minute bargain. but some are finding out it's already too late. >> julie: a "fox news" whether alerts. the first atlantic hurricane of the season for the off the east coast tonight churning up rough seas and recurrence. hurricane bill will likely not make landfall here in the u.s. but it is still packing or the forceful winds reaching up to 85 mph. it is ruining one of the last vacation weekends of the summer. one of the states being hit forces of massachusetts. resident obama is traveling there tomorrow with his family.
fundamentals. such as what is the nature of our economy? why do we consume so much? is america still a global leader? when you peruse the book shelves and read the op ed pages you see titles like a failure of capitalism. big government ahead. america the tarnished. now comes kurt andersen who examines how we got here and where we go in a new book, reset, how the cries kiss restore our values and renew america. it grew out of a essay he wrote in "time" magazine called the end of excess. i'm pleased to have our friend kurt andersen back at this table. >> you just saw me do a program on iraq an afghanistan. so what are your thoughts about america's efforts there and the risks that we have that afghanistan becomes a long slog as iraq became. >> it may welcome that. and that was a great show, to talk about. because i don't think as your guest said that people, americans generally understand what a -- what a large engagement afghanistan may become. i do think the fact that this obama administration, a guy who after all got elected as the anti-war candidate of the two leading democratic candidates h
is you've founded an organization called upgrade america. what is this about some. >> upgrade america kinds of brought it out of katrina. it's kind of a social organization that allows young people to channel their energy into being -- in order to empower each other and move forward and be positive. we like to do positive things in the community, so rather than complaining about the problem, we twri to upgrade america. so we do everything from ballot guides during the last presidential location to going back to new orleans and rebuilding, also dealing with d.c. issues here in d.c., as well. so we do a lot of different things. just trying to upgrade america using young people's energy. >> four years later, thanks so much for talking to us and for making a difference. >> thank you very much. >>> and we'll check back in with you i'm sure on the fifth anniversary, as well. >> have a great day. >>> well, it is news that came a little too late for big papi. a federal appeals court ruled federal agents had no right to seize players drug test result which is were supposed to be anonymous. >>>
. there you go. >> i cannot believe that we have a president of the united states of america and grand junction, colorado. [ applause ] >> we're so proud of you. >> thank you. >> my name is maria wells, and i live on the slope in gross, colorado and i'm a naturalized citizen and i'm proud to be an american. [ applause ] >> as a child i had polio and i have had serious surgeries, 52 of them to correct my poor construction bonds. between hear, deborah, montrose and the mayo clinic in phoenix, arizona. i have been blessed with good insurance, generally excellent doctors and care, however, my major concern is cost even with good -- even with good insurance , our cost is then high , practically and i have been gone out of the network, why should our doctors treatment choice be limited by a geographic area or the state? what kind of competition is this, mr. president? thank you. >> all right. this raises an important question, because it goes to the overall debate that's taking place out there right now. when we talk about reform, you hear some opponents of reform sang that somehow we are tr
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